Sending Luggage During Lockdown

Luggage Tips Travel Updates

How many of us were caught off guard when the UK went into lockdown? What I mean by caught off guard is where you were when it was announced and for some people that place wasn’t where they would ideally have been? Having to work away from home perhaps, or staying with friends or relatives? Most people in these circumstances did of course get themselves “back to base” in the small window between the announcement and the start of the curfew. But there were a few people who either couldn’t get back or chose not to, and who decided to stay where they were when lockdown was announced. But many weeks in to lockdown and if they only have the clothes they had with them at the time – perhaps only a week’s worth of clothes incumbent with March’s chill climate as opposed to the glorious spring weather we have been getting in May. This is where services provided by businesses like Luggage Mule come in to their own, and a friend or relative is able to send a suitcase of clothes to their stranded loved ones with a fresh summer wardrobe.  

The subject of where people are locked down had become a bit of a heated issue in hotpots known for urbanites who have chosen to hold up in their second homes or holiday homes where there’s easy access to expansive country walks or coastal paths and beaches, as opposed to the smaller confines of big cities, where Coronavirus is far more prevalent. The latest rules on lockdown allow people more freedom to move around, but this is unlikely to change the resentment felt by genuine local residents living in second home hotspots such as Cornwall, Devon, The Cotswolds and Lake District. They feel that the city dwellers are bringing the virus with them. But surely if social distancing measures are respected there shouldn’t be any genuine fears. These second home hotspots must be suffering more than most with the lack of business provided by tourists and second home owners who would normally have been in their shops and restaurants.  

One of the few positives to have come out of the pandemic has been a return of an often lost community spirit in local neighbourhoods. This is one of the accusations made to second home owners in that they don’t contribute to the local communities and that their properties lie dormant for a good part of the year. In some ways it’s a compelling argument, but surely we don’t want to become such a totalitarian state whereby you are not allowed to own a second property? Progressive taxing has made second property ownership more expensive, but I guess for the super wealthy it’s not a significant deterrent. The great thing about community spirit and looking after your neighbours is that anyone can do it, whatever their background, it’s not mandatory, it’s not something that requires a stick or a carrot, and the rewards are purely that you get that special feeling about doing something good for others.  

Photo Credit SL Wong